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Colour-blind or colour-deficient?
A person with colour vision problems has historically been referred to as “colour-blind.” Very few people are truly “colour-blind” and these people only view the world in black, white and grey. Most people with colour-vision problems or defects are not truly “colour-blind.” They are simply less-sensitive to particular colours, often green or red. This means they have difficulty differentiating between certain shades of green or red, and they are (more accurately) regarded as “colour-deficient.” Colour vision deficiencies mainly affect males.

 

colourvision

What is the treatment for colour vision deficiency?
None. There is no treatment for colour vision deficiencies. It is also worth noting that most colour vision deficiencies do not change with age i.e. they remain the same throughout life.

Why is it important to know about a colour vision deficiency?
Where there is a notable colour vision deficiency, it is important to be mindful of it during childhood as teachers need to be made aware at school, and during adulthood as it influences the choice of career. Examples of careers where colour vision deficiencies can be a problem are electrical engineering, printer, police or national security work.

Last words
Colour vision deficiencies are more common than you might think! Our recommendation is to have the colour vision tested before the age of 10 years. There are different ways of assessing colour vision, and your eye care practitioner will perform the most appropriate method for each individual.

Useful link: to better understand what a person with colour vision deficiency sees, click here.

Other topics of interest: DyslexiaMeares-Irlen Syndrome, Top Ten Tips

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